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'We worked very hard' - Students from Soshanguve build solar-powered train03:13

'We worked very hard' - Students from Soshanguve build solar-powered train

South Africa, Soshanguve
October 22, 2022 at 04:29 GMT +00:00 · Published

A team of students at Soshanguve Technical High School designed a mobile solar-powered train as footage filmed on Friday shows.

A group of 19 students built a pilot solar locomotive that has four solar panels attached to its roof and promises to travel 60 km (37.2 mi) at speed of 30 km per hour (18.6 mi per hour).

Footage features a site with about 50 metres of track laid out on which a solar-powered wagon was positioned. Students could remotely control the wagon via laptop. Inside the wagon was also a screen that could draw electronic power from the sun.

Ronnie Masindi, one of the students who participated in the project, said that the team 'looked at problems that South Africa is currently facing.'

"We were able to identify that one of the major problems is load shedding and also cable theft. And as trains are our main mode of transport we decided why do not we actually create a solar-powered train in order for it to move," the teenager said.

Another project participant mentioned that it was 'quite difficult' for students to focus on both, the project and studies at school.

"Some of our marks this year started dropping but we had to work hard, we had to work extra hours, so it was difficult," Princess Julius said.

Kgomotso Moinane, a teacher, mentioned that 'alcohol abuse and other crimes are very rife' in Soshanguve and the project kept students busy and shifted their focus 'from doing wrong things to doing right things.'

"I am very proud of them and I can say it's a testimony to say if you give learners a chance, if you provide them with resources if you give them proper support the sky is the limit, they can do anything," the teacher added.

Students reportedly started working on the locomotive in 2020. The blue and white train, named Modjadji, after the Rain Queen of the people of Limpopo, has mirrors, wipers, carpets, and enough space inside for two passengers.

'We worked very hard' - Students from Soshanguve build solar-powered train03:13
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A team of students at Soshanguve Technical High School designed a mobile solar-powered train as footage filmed on Friday shows.

A group of 19 students built a pilot solar locomotive that has four solar panels attached to its roof and promises to travel 60 km (37.2 mi) at speed of 30 km per hour (18.6 mi per hour).

Footage features a site with about 50 metres of track laid out on which a solar-powered wagon was positioned. Students could remotely control the wagon via laptop. Inside the wagon was also a screen that could draw electronic power from the sun.

Ronnie Masindi, one of the students who participated in the project, said that the team 'looked at problems that South Africa is currently facing.'

"We were able to identify that one of the major problems is load shedding and also cable theft. And as trains are our main mode of transport we decided why do not we actually create a solar-powered train in order for it to move," the teenager said.

Another project participant mentioned that it was 'quite difficult' for students to focus on both, the project and studies at school.

"Some of our marks this year started dropping but we had to work hard, we had to work extra hours, so it was difficult," Princess Julius said.

Kgomotso Moinane, a teacher, mentioned that 'alcohol abuse and other crimes are very rife' in Soshanguve and the project kept students busy and shifted their focus 'from doing wrong things to doing right things.'

"I am very proud of them and I can say it's a testimony to say if you give learners a chance, if you provide them with resources if you give them proper support the sky is the limit, they can do anything," the teacher added.

Students reportedly started working on the locomotive in 2020. The blue and white train, named Modjadji, after the Rain Queen of the people of Limpopo, has mirrors, wipers, carpets, and enough space inside for two passengers.