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Netherlands: Artist duo recreates textile using immigrants' Golden Age techniques03:21

Netherlands: Artist duo recreates textile using immigrants' Golden Age techniques

Netherlands, Leiden
September 13, 2022 at 06:38 GMT +00:00 · Published

The artists Nina Mathijsen and Sara Vrugt realised a historical, rather experimental project for the Museum De Lakenhal in Leiden on Saturday.

Footage shows the two artists displaying a fabric of Bordeaux-like colour inside the museum. Experts examined the artwork for consistency, and then the De Lakenhal director stamped it to identify the fabric as the museum's exhibit. Visitors marvelled at the yarn and partially touched it, which the artists encouraged by ceremonially carrying parts of the curtain around.

The project consisted of weaving a cloth the way wool was woven and prepared in the 17th century. For this purpose, according to local media, more than 150 volunteers were brought in and helped for three months to mix the wool with urine and butter the old-fashioned way. The further method of production also involved volunteers stepping with their feet on the wool soaked with the soap mixture.

Museum experts concluded that because of its texture, colour and the way it was made, all the processes were carried out exactly as they had been in the Dutch Golden Age, a time when the textile industry had been one of the richest and most prosperous in the world.

Reportedly, the fabric would be on display at the museum for a few months.

Netherlands: Artist duo recreates textile using immigrants' Golden Age techniques03:21
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The artists Nina Mathijsen and Sara Vrugt realised a historical, rather experimental project for the Museum De Lakenhal in Leiden on Saturday.

Footage shows the two artists displaying a fabric of Bordeaux-like colour inside the museum. Experts examined the artwork for consistency, and then the De Lakenhal director stamped it to identify the fabric as the museum's exhibit. Visitors marvelled at the yarn and partially touched it, which the artists encouraged by ceremonially carrying parts of the curtain around.

The project consisted of weaving a cloth the way wool was woven and prepared in the 17th century. For this purpose, according to local media, more than 150 volunteers were brought in and helped for three months to mix the wool with urine and butter the old-fashioned way. The further method of production also involved volunteers stepping with their feet on the wool soaked with the soap mixture.

Museum experts concluded that because of its texture, colour and the way it was made, all the processes were carried out exactly as they had been in the Dutch Golden Age, a time when the textile industry had been one of the richest and most prosperous in the world.

Reportedly, the fabric would be on display at the museum for a few months.