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Spain: Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias votes in General Election01:51

Spain: Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias votes in General Election

Spain, Madrid
June 26, 2016 at 12:22 GMT +00:00 · Published

Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias cast his ballot in Madrid, Sunday, as Spanish voters head to the polls for the country's latest general election. After casting his ballot at the Tirso de Molina institute Iglesias declared that "a change in the system of the political parties is being consolidated in Spain."

Commenting on the UK vote in favour of leaving the European Union, Iglesis denied his party is Eurosceptic, saying the result made him "very sad."

Spain's previous election in December 2015 resulted in stalemate, with no agreement being reached on coalition between the various political parties, none of whom maintains an overall parliamentary majority. The incumbent Partido Popular (PP) party are likely to come out on top in Sunday's contest according to polls, with the conservative party expected to take 28% of the vote.

A leftist alliance, Podemos Unidos, is polling in second place at 25%, followed by Spain's traditional centre-left party the PSOE (Socialist Party) with 20% of the vote share. The PSOE has faced pressure in recent weeks from sections of its support base to join a coalition with Podemos Unidos in order to remove the PP from power.

Spain: Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias votes in General Election01:51
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Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias cast his ballot in Madrid, Sunday, as Spanish voters head to the polls for the country's latest general election. After casting his ballot at the Tirso de Molina institute Iglesias declared that "a change in the system of the political parties is being consolidated in Spain."

Commenting on the UK vote in favour of leaving the European Union, Iglesis denied his party is Eurosceptic, saying the result made him "very sad."

Spain's previous election in December 2015 resulted in stalemate, with no agreement being reached on coalition between the various political parties, none of whom maintains an overall parliamentary majority. The incumbent Partido Popular (PP) party are likely to come out on top in Sunday's contest according to polls, with the conservative party expected to take 28% of the vote.

A leftist alliance, Podemos Unidos, is polling in second place at 25%, followed by Spain's traditional centre-left party the PSOE (Socialist Party) with 20% of the vote share. The PSOE has faced pressure in recent weeks from sections of its support base to join a coalition with Podemos Unidos in order to remove the PP from power.