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Sri Lanka: 1.5 tons of seized illegal ivory crushed in machine02:25

Sri Lanka: 1.5 tons of seized illegal ivory crushed in machine

Sri Lanka, Galle Face Green, Colombo
January 26, 2016 at 17:50 GMT +00:00 · Published

Sri Lankan officials destroyed the largest-ever haul of seized illegal ivory in the country's history, at a public crushing of the poached tusks in Galle Face Green, Colombo, on Tuesday. The event, which saw the pulverised ivory burned in an incinerator, is intended to send a message to smugglers.

The ivory came from a single shipment of 359 tusks, weighing 1.5 tons, that was seized by customs authorities at the Port of Colombo in May 2012. The shipment was in transit from Kenya to Dubai.

DNA testing later showed that the tusks came from Tanzania. Organisers observed a two-minute silence for the slain elephants before Buddhist, Hindu, Christian and Muslim leaders performed funeral rites for the animals.The illegal trade in ivory from African elephants is driven largely by Asian and Middle Eastern demand for their tusks, which are used in ornaments and medicines.

Sri Lanka: 1.5 tons of seized illegal ivory crushed in machine02:25
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Sri Lankan officials destroyed the largest-ever haul of seized illegal ivory in the country's history, at a public crushing of the poached tusks in Galle Face Green, Colombo, on Tuesday. The event, which saw the pulverised ivory burned in an incinerator, is intended to send a message to smugglers.

The ivory came from a single shipment of 359 tusks, weighing 1.5 tons, that was seized by customs authorities at the Port of Colombo in May 2012. The shipment was in transit from Kenya to Dubai.

DNA testing later showed that the tusks came from Tanzania. Organisers observed a two-minute silence for the slain elephants before Buddhist, Hindu, Christian and Muslim leaders performed funeral rites for the animals.The illegal trade in ivory from African elephants is driven largely by Asian and Middle Eastern demand for their tusks, which are used in ornaments and medicines.