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Germany: Thousands of German Turks decry Armenian ‘genocide’ allegations01:32

Germany: Thousands of German Turks decry Armenian ‘genocide’ allegations

Germany, Berlin
April 25, 2015 at 15:44 GMT +00:00 · Published

Thousands of people belonging to Berlin’s Turkish community marched through the streets of Germany’s capital, Saturday, to protest recent comments by several world leaders labelling the mass killing of an estimated 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks during World War I as a “genocide.”

The march, held one day after the 100th anniversary of the mass killing, featured thousands of protesters waving Turkish flags and carrying banners decrying the genocide allegations. Walking through central Berlin, the protesters were stopped from facing off with a demonstration organised by Berlin’s Armenian community to commemorate the 100th anniversary. Although riot police flanked the march, there were no reports of violence.

Whilst the Turkish government and many of the rally's participants acknowledge the mass killing of Armenians which took place 100 years ago, Ankara refuses to recognise the mass killing as a "genocide," arguing crimes were committed on both sides.

Germany: Thousands of German Turks decry Armenian ‘genocide’ allegations01:32
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Thousands of people belonging to Berlin’s Turkish community marched through the streets of Germany’s capital, Saturday, to protest recent comments by several world leaders labelling the mass killing of an estimated 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks during World War I as a “genocide.”

The march, held one day after the 100th anniversary of the mass killing, featured thousands of protesters waving Turkish flags and carrying banners decrying the genocide allegations. Walking through central Berlin, the protesters were stopped from facing off with a demonstration organised by Berlin’s Armenian community to commemorate the 100th anniversary. Although riot police flanked the march, there were no reports of violence.

Whilst the Turkish government and many of the rally's participants acknowledge the mass killing of Armenians which took place 100 years ago, Ankara refuses to recognise the mass killing as a "genocide," arguing crimes were committed on both sides.