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Sudan: Police shoot-to-kill fuel price protesters01:16

Sudan: Police shoot-to-kill fuel price protesters

Sudan, Khartoum
September 28, 2013 at 00:34 GMT +00:00 · Published

Sudan: Police shoot-to-kill fuel price protesters

Sudanese police fired live ammunition at protesters in Khartoum's Omdurman Al Thawera region and on 60th Street, Friday, during a week of intensifying protests over fuel subsidy cuts in Sudan, in which over people 50 are reported to have been killed.

Amnesty International and the African Centre for Justice and Peace Studies say that police are shooting to kill, stating that forces have been taking deliberate aim at protesters' heads and chests. Internet Sudanese media puts the death count at over 183 killed since the protests began at the beginning of the week. The Sudanese government is currently claiming a lower figure of 29 dead.

Fuel prices went up by more than double their original price just days after the government axed its fuel subsidy policy, leading to the outbreak of nation-wide protests on Monday.

The government of long-standing president Oman Hassan al-Bashit has reportedly tried to prevent the Sudanese press from covering the protests, with only around five newspaper organisations actually going to the presses on Thursday.

These are believed to be the worst clashes that Sudan has experienced for years.

Sudan: Police shoot-to-kill fuel price protesters01:16
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Sudan: Police shoot-to-kill fuel price protesters

Sudanese police fired live ammunition at protesters in Khartoum's Omdurman Al Thawera region and on 60th Street, Friday, during a week of intensifying protests over fuel subsidy cuts in Sudan, in which over people 50 are reported to have been killed.

Amnesty International and the African Centre for Justice and Peace Studies say that police are shooting to kill, stating that forces have been taking deliberate aim at protesters' heads and chests. Internet Sudanese media puts the death count at over 183 killed since the protests began at the beginning of the week. The Sudanese government is currently claiming a lower figure of 29 dead.

Fuel prices went up by more than double their original price just days after the government axed its fuel subsidy policy, leading to the outbreak of nation-wide protests on Monday.

The government of long-standing president Oman Hassan al-Bashit has reportedly tried to prevent the Sudanese press from covering the protests, with only around five newspaper organisations actually going to the presses on Thursday.

These are believed to be the worst clashes that Sudan has experienced for years.