This site uses cookies. By accepting cookies you can optimise your browsing experience. Read more.
USA: Elder statesman Gareth Evans backs UN intervention in Syria01:17

USA: Elder statesman Gareth Evans backs UN intervention in Syria

United States, New York
September 12, 2013 at 20:25 GMT +00:00 · Published

USA: Elder statesman Gareth Evans backs UN intervention in Syria

Former Australian foreign minister and architect of the United Nations' Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle, Gareth Evans, backed non-military intervention in Syria in an interview with RT on Wednesday. Speaking from New York, the senior diplomat, who also served as the co-chair of the International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation, said that while standing by was no longer an option, the world community must act together to effectively intervene.

"I think the US are listening to world and domestic opinion, and it's sure as hell not going to go down on military intervention path unless there's very strong and compelling reasons for doing so and unless it has a very strong and compelling measure of international and domestic support," said the former minister. "And I think it's not an unreasonable position to adopt. We've been there before back in the 90s of standing idly by watching these terrible massacres occur with the rest of the world saying 'it's none of our business'."

"We've been there before in the 1990s with the fundamental argument being out there, a consensus-free zone between the global North and the global South; the North saying 'go in there with all the guns blazing', the South saying 'under no circumstances'. We do, I think, have a sensible new way of looking at these issues through the lens of the responsibility to protect. And it's very important that we work together cohesively, internationally, to respond effectively to the situations as there are. But doing nothing is no longer an option when we are faced with major crimes against humanity and war crimes at the kind that we've seen in Syria."

The Responsibility to Protect, endorsed by the UN at its 2005 World Summit, states that the international community has a responsibility to protect citizens of all nations from genocide and mass atrocities.

USA: Elder statesman Gareth Evans backs UN intervention in Syria01:17
No Account? Sign up!
Top downloads in last 24 hours
Show more
Description

USA: Elder statesman Gareth Evans backs UN intervention in Syria

Former Australian foreign minister and architect of the United Nations' Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle, Gareth Evans, backed non-military intervention in Syria in an interview with RT on Wednesday. Speaking from New York, the senior diplomat, who also served as the co-chair of the International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation, said that while standing by was no longer an option, the world community must act together to effectively intervene.

"I think the US are listening to world and domestic opinion, and it's sure as hell not going to go down on military intervention path unless there's very strong and compelling reasons for doing so and unless it has a very strong and compelling measure of international and domestic support," said the former minister. "And I think it's not an unreasonable position to adopt. We've been there before back in the 90s of standing idly by watching these terrible massacres occur with the rest of the world saying 'it's none of our business'."

"We've been there before in the 1990s with the fundamental argument being out there, a consensus-free zone between the global North and the global South; the North saying 'go in there with all the guns blazing', the South saying 'under no circumstances'. We do, I think, have a sensible new way of looking at these issues through the lens of the responsibility to protect. And it's very important that we work together cohesively, internationally, to respond effectively to the situations as there are. But doing nothing is no longer an option when we are faced with major crimes against humanity and war crimes at the kind that we've seen in Syria."

The Responsibility to Protect, endorsed by the UN at its 2005 World Summit, states that the international community has a responsibility to protect citizens of all nations from genocide and mass atrocities.