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Space: ISS hatch closes as Vinogradov takes command01:06

Space: ISS hatch closes as Vinogradov takes command

Russian Federation, International Space Station and Korolev
May 14, 2013 at 05:03 GMT +00:00 · Published

Space: ISS hatch closes as Vinogradov takes command

Marking the end of Expedition 35 and the start of Expedition 36, under command of Pavel Vinogradov of Roscosmos, the International Space Station hatch closed on Tuesday sending three crew members back to earth in a Soyuz TMA-07M space craft. The three ended five months in orbit when they landed in Kazakhstan in the early hours of the morning. They spent 146 days in space since launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on December 19, 2012.

Vinogradov and his crewmates Chris Cassidy of NASA and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin will tend to the station as a three-person crew for two-weeks until the arrival of three new crew members: NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency.

According to NASA, "Expedition 35/36 continues to expand the scope of research aboard the International Space Station, operating with a predominately six-person crew. The research mission of the station is to develop knowledge that strengthens our economy and improves life on Earth, advances future exploration beyond Earth orbit, and uses this unique laboratory for scientific discovery."

During the latest mission aboard the ISS, Cassidy and fellow NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn went on an impromptu six-hour spacewalk on Saturday to find and fix a leak in the space station's cooling system. The astronauts are continuing to search for the source of the leak both inside and outside the ISS.

Launched in 1998, the International Space Station is the largest human-made object in orbit, capable of housing a crew of up to six for extended periods of time. It is a joint project among five participating space agencies: Roscosmos, NASA, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Space: ISS hatch closes as Vinogradov takes command01:06
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Space: ISS hatch closes as Vinogradov takes command

Marking the end of Expedition 35 and the start of Expedition 36, under command of Pavel Vinogradov of Roscosmos, the International Space Station hatch closed on Tuesday sending three crew members back to earth in a Soyuz TMA-07M space craft. The three ended five months in orbit when they landed in Kazakhstan in the early hours of the morning. They spent 146 days in space since launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on December 19, 2012.

Vinogradov and his crewmates Chris Cassidy of NASA and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin will tend to the station as a three-person crew for two-weeks until the arrival of three new crew members: NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency.

According to NASA, "Expedition 35/36 continues to expand the scope of research aboard the International Space Station, operating with a predominately six-person crew. The research mission of the station is to develop knowledge that strengthens our economy and improves life on Earth, advances future exploration beyond Earth orbit, and uses this unique laboratory for scientific discovery."

During the latest mission aboard the ISS, Cassidy and fellow NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn went on an impromptu six-hour spacewalk on Saturday to find and fix a leak in the space station's cooling system. The astronauts are continuing to search for the source of the leak both inside and outside the ISS.

Launched in 1998, the International Space Station is the largest human-made object in orbit, capable of housing a crew of up to six for extended periods of time. It is a joint project among five participating space agencies: Roscosmos, NASA, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency.