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Stripped bare! Dozens take part in Kyushu island’s purification bathing ritual03:57

Stripped bare! Dozens take part in Kyushu island’s purification bathing ritual

Japón, Miyazaki
23 enero, 2023 a las 13:04 GMT +00:00 · Publicado

Japanese men stripped down to loincloths and women wore lintels as they rushed into the sea to purify themselves as part of a naked Mairi festival close to Aoshima Shrine in Miyazaki City on Saturday.

This year's event marked the first time the event was open to the public after two years of shrunk number of participants due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"The origin of this festival is a myth that people went to welcome the Gods in a hurry naked without any clothes, and that is why we visit the shrine naked in this cold January season," said one of the participants.

As part of the ritual, a 'Yutate' ritual was also held in the precincts of the shrine, in which hot water heated in a kettle was sprinkled on the participants to ward off bad omens and pray for good health.

Stripped bare! Dozens take part in Kyushu island’s purification bathing ritual03:57
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Descripción

Japanese men stripped down to loincloths and women wore lintels as they rushed into the sea to purify themselves as part of a naked Mairi festival close to Aoshima Shrine in Miyazaki City on Saturday.

This year's event marked the first time the event was open to the public after two years of shrunk number of participants due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"The origin of this festival is a myth that people went to welcome the Gods in a hurry naked without any clothes, and that is why we visit the shrine naked in this cold January season," said one of the participants.

As part of the ritual, a 'Yutate' ritual was also held in the precincts of the shrine, in which hot water heated in a kettle was sprinkled on the participants to ward off bad omens and pray for good health.