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Nepal: Handover of victims' bodies to families continues after Pokhara plane crash04:27

Nepal: Handover of victims' bodies to families continues after Pokhara plane crash

Nepal, Pokhara
enero 18, 2023 at 05:02 GMT +00:00 · Published

The bodies of the victims of Sunday’s Pokhara plane crash continuedto be assessed at Gandaki hospital in the city on Tuesday, with some requiring DNA testing before they could be released to family members.

"Two of my friends’ dead bodies were recognisable but we were told to take them to Kathmandu city for their DNA test which has been slightly painful for us," explained Chandra Raj Shrestha.

Footage shows security officers making transportation arrangements, with body bags seen loaded on trucks.

"The body has to be sent to Kathmandu for a DNA test, this has taken mental and physical toil on their relatives and families," said another Shiva Adhikari.

Family members continued to gather outside the facility, with some blaming the authorities for the disaster.

"No immediate actions were taken, If they acted swiftly it would have saved many lives, or at least helped in identifying the dead bodies," continued Shrestha. "The responsible authorities, government, and common people need to own up to their responsibilities and act accordingly."

However, others praised the crew of the plane.

"I would salute the pilot because he avoided the settlement area and the crowded places which saved many lives outside the flight area," Adhikari commented.

The Yeti airlines flight from Kathmandu crashed near Pokhara airport on Sunday, with 72 people on board. At least 69 are confirmed dead, while officials also believe the three missing were also killed.

According to the authorities, 53 passengers were Nepalese, with those from India, Russia, Korea, the UK, Australia, Argentina and France.

The cause of the tragedy remains unknown, although media reports state that investigators have recovered voice and flight data recorders.

Nepal: Handover of victims' bodies to families continues after Pokhara plane crash04:27
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The bodies of the victims of Sunday’s Pokhara plane crash continuedto be assessed at Gandaki hospital in the city on Tuesday, with some requiring DNA testing before they could be released to family members.

"Two of my friends’ dead bodies were recognisable but we were told to take them to Kathmandu city for their DNA test which has been slightly painful for us," explained Chandra Raj Shrestha.

Footage shows security officers making transportation arrangements, with body bags seen loaded on trucks.

"The body has to be sent to Kathmandu for a DNA test, this has taken mental and physical toil on their relatives and families," said another Shiva Adhikari.

Family members continued to gather outside the facility, with some blaming the authorities for the disaster.

"No immediate actions were taken, If they acted swiftly it would have saved many lives, or at least helped in identifying the dead bodies," continued Shrestha. "The responsible authorities, government, and common people need to own up to their responsibilities and act accordingly."

However, others praised the crew of the plane.

"I would salute the pilot because he avoided the settlement area and the crowded places which saved many lives outside the flight area," Adhikari commented.

The Yeti airlines flight from Kathmandu crashed near Pokhara airport on Sunday, with 72 people on board. At least 69 are confirmed dead, while officials also believe the three missing were also killed.

According to the authorities, 53 passengers were Nepalese, with those from India, Russia, Korea, the UK, Australia, Argentina and France.

The cause of the tragedy remains unknown, although media reports state that investigators have recovered voice and flight data recorders.