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State of Palestine: 'We consider it theft!' - Officials condemn 'Israel’s control' of water supplies in Ramallah03:30

State of Palestine: 'We consider it theft!' - Officials condemn 'Israel’s control' of water supplies in Ramallah

Palestinian Territory, Occupied, Ramallah
November 30, 2022 at 20:14 GMT +00:00 · Published

Palestinian officials hit out at what they claim is 'theft' of their water supplies in Ramallah on Wednesday, just days after PM Mohammad Ibrahim Shtayyeh accused Israel of 'stealing' his state’s groundwater.

"We consider it theft of Palestinian water and the Palestinian right," said Tayseer Abu Mufarah, Director of Tuqu' municipality. "The four water wells located in the town of Tekoa in Bethlehem are under the Israeli control."

Footage shows supply pipelines and infrastructure around Ramallah, as well as a makeshift fountain and pond.

"The pipeline feeding the Palestinians is two inches (5.08 centimeters) while the line for the (Israeli) settlements is more than 15 inches (38.1 centimeters)," continued the director, claiming that metre measurements and locations are "clear evidence on racism and their control over Palestinian water."

The prime minister alleged on Sunday that more than two-thirds of groundwater, "600 million cubic meters of Palestine's 800 million cubic meters", is diverted to Israeli cities and settlements.

Adel Yassin, director of strategic planning and information at the Palestinian Water Authority said that Israel’s "seizure of all water sources" in 1967 meant that "no Palestinian has been allowed not only to dig wells, collect rain water, or even exploit spring water."

Wednesday also marked the state of the Fourth Arab Water Conference organised by Palestine in Cairo.

Water access and supply has been one of the major points of contention in any peace negotiations. Israel has not responded to the prime minister’s comments although has previously maintained that it is the Palestinian Authority’s job to supply water to its citizens.

According to the EU, Tel Aviv controls around 80 percent of water in the West Bank. The Joint Water Committee - composed of representatives of both the Israeli and Palestinian sides - was created in 1995 to manage water and sewage related infrastructure in the region, although was only intended to be a temporary measure.

Under a more recent 2017 deal, Israel agreed to provide better access to Palestinian towns and villages, and develop and modernise the water infrastructure in the West Bank.

State of Palestine: 'We consider it theft!' - Officials condemn 'Israel’s control' of water supplies in Ramallah03:30
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Palestinian officials hit out at what they claim is 'theft' of their water supplies in Ramallah on Wednesday, just days after PM Mohammad Ibrahim Shtayyeh accused Israel of 'stealing' his state’s groundwater.

"We consider it theft of Palestinian water and the Palestinian right," said Tayseer Abu Mufarah, Director of Tuqu' municipality. "The four water wells located in the town of Tekoa in Bethlehem are under the Israeli control."

Footage shows supply pipelines and infrastructure around Ramallah, as well as a makeshift fountain and pond.

"The pipeline feeding the Palestinians is two inches (5.08 centimeters) while the line for the (Israeli) settlements is more than 15 inches (38.1 centimeters)," continued the director, claiming that metre measurements and locations are "clear evidence on racism and their control over Palestinian water."

The prime minister alleged on Sunday that more than two-thirds of groundwater, "600 million cubic meters of Palestine's 800 million cubic meters", is diverted to Israeli cities and settlements.

Adel Yassin, director of strategic planning and information at the Palestinian Water Authority said that Israel’s "seizure of all water sources" in 1967 meant that "no Palestinian has been allowed not only to dig wells, collect rain water, or even exploit spring water."

Wednesday also marked the state of the Fourth Arab Water Conference organised by Palestine in Cairo.

Water access and supply has been one of the major points of contention in any peace negotiations. Israel has not responded to the prime minister’s comments although has previously maintained that it is the Palestinian Authority’s job to supply water to its citizens.

According to the EU, Tel Aviv controls around 80 percent of water in the West Bank. The Joint Water Committee - composed of representatives of both the Israeli and Palestinian sides - was created in 1995 to manage water and sewage related infrastructure in the region, although was only intended to be a temporary measure.

Under a more recent 2017 deal, Israel agreed to provide better access to Palestinian towns and villages, and develop and modernise the water infrastructure in the West Bank.