This website uses cookies. Some are necessary to help our website work properly and can't be switched off, and some are optional but can optimise your browsing experience. To manage your cookie choices, click on Open settings.
Russia: Moscow makes every effort to ensure safety around Zaporozhye nuclear plant - Ryabkov
06:43

Russia: Moscow makes every effort to ensure safety around Zaporozhye nuclear plant - Ryabkov

Russian Federation, Moscow
November 24, 2022 at 19:16 GMT +00:00 · Published

Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said that Russia was doing everything possible to ensure security around the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant, during a briefing ahead of the IX Review Conference of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), to be held in Geneva from November 28 to December 16.

"Given the newly intensified shelling directly on the territory of the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant (ZNPP) by the Ukrainian Armed Forces, during which important infrastructure of the plant was damaged, our observations suggest that the decision on the protection zone should be taken fairly quickly," he claimed.

On Sunday, November 20, the Russian Defence Ministry reported on the resumed shelling at the ZNPP. It alleged that 20 large-calibre shells were fired at the plant by the Ukrainian side over the weekend.

Meanwhile, Ukrainian company Energoatom posted on its Telegram channel on Sunday that the shelling of the territory had been conducted by the Russian side.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reported that same day that shelling had taken place, while "more than a dozen explosions were heard within a short period of time".

"The news from our team yesterday and this morning is extremely disturbing," said the agency’s head Rafael Grossi. "Explosions occurred at the site of this major nuclear power plant, which is completely unacceptable. Whoever is behind this, it must stop immediately. As I have said many times before, you’re playing with fire."

Both Moscow and Kiev have repeatedly accused each other of shelling the plant since July, after Russian forces took control in March.

Grossi led an IAEA mission to the site in September, with a team of experts setting up a permanent presence. In October, Russian President Vladimir Putin held a meeting with Grossi, saying that Russia was open to "dialogue".

Earlier in November, the IAEA Board of Governors passed a third resolution - following similar action in March and September - calling on Russia to "cease all actions" at nuclear plants in Ukraine, saying that the country should "immediately withdraw its military and other personnel" from the Zaporozhye plant.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky described "demilitarisation" of the site as "extremely important", saying he was working to "ensure the implementation of the IAEA order to stop any hostile activity against Ukrainian nuclear facilities".

The Russian mission described the resolution as "unprofessionally drafted" and a "further step towards politicising the work of the IAEA".

Zaporozhye is one of four regions that Putin agreed to allow to accede to the Russian Federation at the end of September. Moscow cited the results of recent referenda and the right to self-determination, while Kiev and its allies called it an annexation.

Russia: Moscow makes every effort to ensure safety around Zaporozhye nuclear plant - Ryabkov
06:43
Pool for subscribers only
Top downloads in last 24 hours
Show more
Description

Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said that Russia was doing everything possible to ensure security around the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant, during a briefing ahead of the IX Review Conference of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), to be held in Geneva from November 28 to December 16.

"Given the newly intensified shelling directly on the territory of the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant (ZNPP) by the Ukrainian Armed Forces, during which important infrastructure of the plant was damaged, our observations suggest that the decision on the protection zone should be taken fairly quickly," he claimed.

On Sunday, November 20, the Russian Defence Ministry reported on the resumed shelling at the ZNPP. It alleged that 20 large-calibre shells were fired at the plant by the Ukrainian side over the weekend.

Meanwhile, Ukrainian company Energoatom posted on its Telegram channel on Sunday that the shelling of the territory had been conducted by the Russian side.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reported that same day that shelling had taken place, while "more than a dozen explosions were heard within a short period of time".

"The news from our team yesterday and this morning is extremely disturbing," said the agency’s head Rafael Grossi. "Explosions occurred at the site of this major nuclear power plant, which is completely unacceptable. Whoever is behind this, it must stop immediately. As I have said many times before, you’re playing with fire."

Both Moscow and Kiev have repeatedly accused each other of shelling the plant since July, after Russian forces took control in March.

Grossi led an IAEA mission to the site in September, with a team of experts setting up a permanent presence. In October, Russian President Vladimir Putin held a meeting with Grossi, saying that Russia was open to "dialogue".

Earlier in November, the IAEA Board of Governors passed a third resolution - following similar action in March and September - calling on Russia to "cease all actions" at nuclear plants in Ukraine, saying that the country should "immediately withdraw its military and other personnel" from the Zaporozhye plant.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky described "demilitarisation" of the site as "extremely important", saying he was working to "ensure the implementation of the IAEA order to stop any hostile activity against Ukrainian nuclear facilities".

The Russian mission described the resolution as "unprofessionally drafted" and a "further step towards politicising the work of the IAEA".

Zaporozhye is one of four regions that Putin agreed to allow to accede to the Russian Federation at the end of September. Moscow cited the results of recent referenda and the right to self-determination, while Kiev and its allies called it an annexation.