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Burning bright: Hundreds carry flaming torches as fire festival returns to Kurama village04:24

Burning bright: Hundreds carry flaming torches as fire festival returns to Kurama village

Japan, Kurama
October 24, 2022 at 17:24 GMT +00:00 · Published

The Kurama Fire Festival took place in the mountains outside Kyoto City on Saturday, following a three-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Footage shows hundreds of participants preparing their flaming torches, wearing traditional costumes and marching through the village. It marks when the Yuki-jinja Shrine was moved to Kurama during times of war, In the Heian period (794-1185).

"Back in 940, to pray for a peaceful world and people’s happiness, they moved the … goddess in Kyoto imperial palace to [the] Yuki shrine in the North," said one resident, Hashiguchi. "The moving took place in the evening so the fire of the torch was to welcome the goddess."

At the end of the parade, the torches are piled onto a large bonfire.

"It had been three years. It’s the first time I come here but it was definitely really enjoyable," said one visitor, Kusumoto.

The event is one of Kyoto’s most popular fire festivals. Pre-pandemic, many thousands of visitors made the trip to the village.

Burning bright: Hundreds carry flaming torches as fire festival returns to Kurama village04:24
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The Kurama Fire Festival took place in the mountains outside Kyoto City on Saturday, following a three-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Footage shows hundreds of participants preparing their flaming torches, wearing traditional costumes and marching through the village. It marks when the Yuki-jinja Shrine was moved to Kurama during times of war, In the Heian period (794-1185).

"Back in 940, to pray for a peaceful world and people’s happiness, they moved the … goddess in Kyoto imperial palace to [the] Yuki shrine in the North," said one resident, Hashiguchi. "The moving took place in the evening so the fire of the torch was to welcome the goddess."

At the end of the parade, the torches are piled onto a large bonfire.

"It had been three years. It’s the first time I come here but it was definitely really enjoyable," said one visitor, Kusumoto.

The event is one of Kyoto’s most popular fire festivals. Pre-pandemic, many thousands of visitors made the trip to the village.