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Genie with a bottle cap: Japanese artist turns plastic lids into minuscule masterpieces05:28

Genie with a bottle cap: Japanese artist turns plastic lids into minuscule masterpieces

Japan, Tokyo
October 3, 2022 at 17:23 GMT +00:00 · Published

Japanese artist Mito Nishikura has a knack for turning plastic bottle caps into tiny masterpieces, creating painstakingly painted landscapes, as seen in the footage filmed in Tokyo on Saturday.

"I think that plastic bottle caps were originally meant to be thrown away as trash, but now they have become a work of art, and people see the value in them," said the Osaka-based artist.

She is seen taking part in a group exhibition at a gallery in Tokyo's Shibuya district, painting one of her bottle cap designs live in front of the audience, over the course of an hour.

"I was pleased to hear that they found it interesting, and I thought it was very rewarding and interesting from an ecological point of view," she enthused.

The designs are painted freehand without use of a magnifying glass, while the most complex can take up to three hours to perfect.

"The canvas is very small, so I think it is very interesting that a very large world is spread out within it. it is different from drawing on a large piece of paper, and I am fascinated by the fact that there is a whole world inside this small piece," Nishikura explained.

She came up with the idea in June, and has already built up a huge following on social media.

Genie with a bottle cap: Japanese artist turns plastic lids into minuscule masterpieces05:28
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Japanese artist Mito Nishikura has a knack for turning plastic bottle caps into tiny masterpieces, creating painstakingly painted landscapes, as seen in the footage filmed in Tokyo on Saturday.

"I think that plastic bottle caps were originally meant to be thrown away as trash, but now they have become a work of art, and people see the value in them," said the Osaka-based artist.

She is seen taking part in a group exhibition at a gallery in Tokyo's Shibuya district, painting one of her bottle cap designs live in front of the audience, over the course of an hour.

"I was pleased to hear that they found it interesting, and I thought it was very rewarding and interesting from an ecological point of view," she enthused.

The designs are painted freehand without use of a magnifying glass, while the most complex can take up to three hours to perfect.

"The canvas is very small, so I think it is very interesting that a very large world is spread out within it. it is different from drawing on a large piece of paper, and I am fascinated by the fact that there is a whole world inside this small piece," Nishikura explained.

She came up with the idea in June, and has already built up a huge following on social media.