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Ghost village - Submerged remains of Gari Kesrouka return after Dohuk Dam’s water level plummets03:35

Ghost village - Submerged remains of Gari Kesrouka return after Dohuk Dam’s water level plummets

Iraq, Dohuk
agosto 31, 2022 at 12:25 GMT +00:00 · Published

The remains of the abandoned village of Gari Kesrouka re-emerged from the depths as the water level of Iraq’s Dohuk Dam continued to drop, as seen in footage on Monday.

"The main reason that led to this decrease is the lack of rain for two consecutive seasons, where the rainfall rates were less than the normal rates," said researcher, Dr Amjad Obaid. "And the high temperatures may be another reason that led to the evaporation of large quantities of water."

The village, intentionally flooded in 1985, began appearing last September. Footage shows a partially submerged stone building that could’ve been a school.

"If we look at it from a blessing in disguise point of view, we might say it has become a tourist destination because of the appearance of these buildings as monuments," Obaid continued. "But if we look further, we are frankly facing a major environmental catastrophe that we should not underestimate."

The United Nations has classified Iraq as the world’s fifth most vulnerable to climate change, in terms of water, food and extreme temperatures.

Ghost village - Submerged remains of Gari Kesrouka return after Dohuk Dam’s water level plummets03:35
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The remains of the abandoned village of Gari Kesrouka re-emerged from the depths as the water level of Iraq’s Dohuk Dam continued to drop, as seen in footage on Monday.

"The main reason that led to this decrease is the lack of rain for two consecutive seasons, where the rainfall rates were less than the normal rates," said researcher, Dr Amjad Obaid. "And the high temperatures may be another reason that led to the evaporation of large quantities of water."

The village, intentionally flooded in 1985, began appearing last September. Footage shows a partially submerged stone building that could’ve been a school.

"If we look at it from a blessing in disguise point of view, we might say it has become a tourist destination because of the appearance of these buildings as monuments," Obaid continued. "But if we look further, we are frankly facing a major environmental catastrophe that we should not underestimate."

The United Nations has classified Iraq as the world’s fifth most vulnerable to climate change, in terms of water, food and extreme temperatures.