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Writers flock to Tokyo’s ‘Manuscript Writing Cafe’ for better productivity, accountability04:30

Writers flock to Tokyo’s ‘Manuscript Writing Cafe’ for better productivity, accountability

Japan, Tokyo
April 27, 2022 at 19:31 GMT +00:00 · Published

Tokyo’s novel ‘Manuscript Writing Cafe’, a business owned by entrepreneur Takuya Kawai, attracted customers seeking to better concentrate on their writing on Tuesday.

“The first rule is that only people who write manuscripts are allowed in. The other is to have them fill out a form when they first enter the restaurant, stating what kind of manuscript they are going to write here and how much of the goal they are going to achieve,” said Kawai, in an explanation of the cafe’s core concept.

“We set up a system whereby they (customers) cannot leave the cafe until they had completed that manuscript,” added Kawai.

Kawai’s goal was to create a focused environment, resembling that of a library.

“When studying for an exam, some people remember going all the way to the library to study. I wanted to create that kind of situation,” said Kawai.

A progress monitoring service is offered by Kawai as part of the cafe’s concept, to help customers stay focused on the task at hand.

“It's hard to concentrate when I'm at home, and even at regular cafes, even if I open my computer, I end up looking at social networking sites or other unrelated things,” said Yudai, a customer.

Seats at the cafe are limited, with around 10 spots being available to studious customers.

Writers flock to Tokyo’s ‘Manuscript Writing Cafe’ for better productivity, accountability04:30
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Tokyo’s novel ‘Manuscript Writing Cafe’, a business owned by entrepreneur Takuya Kawai, attracted customers seeking to better concentrate on their writing on Tuesday.

“The first rule is that only people who write manuscripts are allowed in. The other is to have them fill out a form when they first enter the restaurant, stating what kind of manuscript they are going to write here and how much of the goal they are going to achieve,” said Kawai, in an explanation of the cafe’s core concept.

“We set up a system whereby they (customers) cannot leave the cafe until they had completed that manuscript,” added Kawai.

Kawai’s goal was to create a focused environment, resembling that of a library.

“When studying for an exam, some people remember going all the way to the library to study. I wanted to create that kind of situation,” said Kawai.

A progress monitoring service is offered by Kawai as part of the cafe’s concept, to help customers stay focused on the task at hand.

“It's hard to concentrate when I'm at home, and even at regular cafes, even if I open my computer, I end up looking at social networking sites or other unrelated things,” said Yudai, a customer.

Seats at the cafe are limited, with around 10 spots being available to studious customers.