This site uses cookies. By accepting cookies you can optimise your browsing experience. Read more.
Germany: Berlin hostel becomes coronavirus gargle test centre03:26

Germany: Berlin hostel becomes coronavirus gargle test centre

Germany, Berlin
February 23, 2021 at 15:46 GMT +00:00 · Published

A hostel in Berlin is offering gargle PCR coronavirus tests, alongside the traditional nose-throat swab, after being temporarily reconverted into a corona test station as seen on Tuesday.

According to the hostel and testing station manager Christian Ewert, the centre is running nearly 150 tests per day, with the gargle test getting a higher demand as patients find it less uncomfortable than regular PCR swab test.

"On some days, we have more PCR gargle tests than PCR swab tests. And it is because some people find it rather uncomfortable when somebody else puts a swab inside of their throat or nose. Gargling is for many people way more relaxed and easier," said Ewert.

The test requires people to gargle a salty liquid into their throat for 10 seconds and spit it into a vial, which also enables a wider distance between patients and health workers.

The test has been approved by the WHO and is accepted by airlines.

Germany: Berlin hostel becomes coronavirus gargle test centre03:26
No Account? Sign up!
Top downloads in last 24 hours
Show more
Description

A hostel in Berlin is offering gargle PCR coronavirus tests, alongside the traditional nose-throat swab, after being temporarily reconverted into a corona test station as seen on Tuesday.

According to the hostel and testing station manager Christian Ewert, the centre is running nearly 150 tests per day, with the gargle test getting a higher demand as patients find it less uncomfortable than regular PCR swab test.

"On some days, we have more PCR gargle tests than PCR swab tests. And it is because some people find it rather uncomfortable when somebody else puts a swab inside of their throat or nose. Gargling is for many people way more relaxed and easier," said Ewert.

The test requires people to gargle a salty liquid into their throat for 10 seconds and spit it into a vial, which also enables a wider distance between patients and health workers.

The test has been approved by the WHO and is accepted by airlines.