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Syria: Families forced to live off scrapping through waste disposal sites03:39

Syria: Families forced to live off scrapping through waste disposal sites

Syrian Arab Republic, Al-Malikiyah District
January 24, 2021 at 12:13 GMT +00:00 · Published

Years of conflict forced some Syrian families to turn to collecting garbage at waste disposal sites to survive in the worsening economic conditions.

Footage filmed on Saturday in Al-Malikiya District of the north-eastern Al-Hasaka province showed a number of people, including women and children, scrapping through the local dump.

"We come here to this waste disposal location every morning scrapping through leftovers and plastics to bring back home and sell to make a living. Sometimes we find food and eat it, even give it to our children at home if there's enough of it. Unfortunately this isn't enough for us. We work early for 2-3,000 SYP (4 Euros, 5.8 US Dollars) and this is never enough. It's not even enough for a breakfast," said Amsha Jameel, one of garbage collectors.

Since the start of the conflict in 2011, Syria has witnessed its worst economic and social crises, compounded by the collapse of the Syrian Pound.

The UN's World Food Program estimates that food prices have tripled in the country with nearly 9.3 million people suffering from food insecurity.

Syria: Families forced to live off scrapping through waste disposal sites03:39
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Years of conflict forced some Syrian families to turn to collecting garbage at waste disposal sites to survive in the worsening economic conditions.

Footage filmed on Saturday in Al-Malikiya District of the north-eastern Al-Hasaka province showed a number of people, including women and children, scrapping through the local dump.

"We come here to this waste disposal location every morning scrapping through leftovers and plastics to bring back home and sell to make a living. Sometimes we find food and eat it, even give it to our children at home if there's enough of it. Unfortunately this isn't enough for us. We work early for 2-3,000 SYP (4 Euros, 5.8 US Dollars) and this is never enough. It's not even enough for a breakfast," said Amsha Jameel, one of garbage collectors.

Since the start of the conflict in 2011, Syria has witnessed its worst economic and social crises, compounded by the collapse of the Syrian Pound.

The UN's World Food Program estimates that food prices have tripled in the country with nearly 9.3 million people suffering from food insecurity.