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Need for speed - South African teen builds own car from scrap metal and spare parts05:25

Need for speed - South African teen builds own car from scrap metal and spare parts

South Africa, Bloemfontein
January 19, 2021 at 15:13 GMT +00:00 · Published

When his father told him he would have to save up and wait to finish school to get his own car, 17-year-old boy Obakeng Thetele from the South African city of Bloemfontein didn't think twice about it. He started collecting scrap metal with one goal: building his own car. He showed off his new ride in footage from Monday.

Inspired by his father's love for mechanics as a mechanical and welding school teacher, the teenager started building his first metal vehicle as early as 2015, although he wasn't able to finish it due to a lack of materials.

"What made me love cars is that I grew up watching my dad fixing them. He taught me while he was working," Obakeng said.

His second attempt was more successful, after his father bought him a motorbike, combined with the coronavirus lockdown, which provided him with enough free time to achieve his goal.

"My encouragement to him is that he must never give up on what he wants to achieve. 'Never give up,' so he must not despair, until he overcomes or wins," Obakeng's father Leepile Thetele said.

The teen drove by his town, showing his own petrol-fuelled motor vehicle with its engine and a four-speed gear system reaching up to 80 km/h (50 mph).

Need for speed - South African teen builds own car from scrap metal and spare parts05:25
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When his father told him he would have to save up and wait to finish school to get his own car, 17-year-old boy Obakeng Thetele from the South African city of Bloemfontein didn't think twice about it. He started collecting scrap metal with one goal: building his own car. He showed off his new ride in footage from Monday.

Inspired by his father's love for mechanics as a mechanical and welding school teacher, the teenager started building his first metal vehicle as early as 2015, although he wasn't able to finish it due to a lack of materials.

"What made me love cars is that I grew up watching my dad fixing them. He taught me while he was working," Obakeng said.

His second attempt was more successful, after his father bought him a motorbike, combined with the coronavirus lockdown, which provided him with enough free time to achieve his goal.

"My encouragement to him is that he must never give up on what he wants to achieve. 'Never give up,' so he must not despair, until he overcomes or wins," Obakeng's father Leepile Thetele said.

The teen drove by his town, showing his own petrol-fuelled motor vehicle with its engine and a four-speed gear system reaching up to 80 km/h (50 mph).