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France: Police use tear gas as protests against new security law escalate01:49

France: Police use tear gas as protests against new security law escalate

France, Paris
November 28, 2020 at 18:29 GMT +00:00 · Published

Police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators during fresh protests in Paris on Saturday against the 'Global Security' bill proposed by the French government.

The organisers which included left-wing activists and several journalists' unions marched from the Place de la Republique to the Place de la Bastille, despite COVID-related restrictions.

Police allowed the protest to go ahead as a static rally, a move met with defiance by the demonstrators who set fire to objects and vehicles and chanted anti-police slogans.

The 'Global Security' bill's Article 24, approved on Friday by the French National Assembly makes it illegal to disseminate images in which police officers can be personally identified. The law has been heavily criticised by activists and journalists saying it violates the freedom of press.

On Friday, Prime Minister Jean Castex announced he would set up a commission to look into Article 24.

France: Police use tear gas as protests against new security law escalate01:49
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Police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators during fresh protests in Paris on Saturday against the 'Global Security' bill proposed by the French government.

The organisers which included left-wing activists and several journalists' unions marched from the Place de la Republique to the Place de la Bastille, despite COVID-related restrictions.

Police allowed the protest to go ahead as a static rally, a move met with defiance by the demonstrators who set fire to objects and vehicles and chanted anti-police slogans.

The 'Global Security' bill's Article 24, approved on Friday by the French National Assembly makes it illegal to disseminate images in which police officers can be personally identified. The law has been heavily criticised by activists and journalists saying it violates the freedom of press.

On Friday, Prime Minister Jean Castex announced he would set up a commission to look into Article 24.