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Norway: Climate scientists prepare to set sail on year-long Arctic expedition02:27

Norway: Climate scientists prepare to set sail on year-long Arctic expedition

Norway, Tromso
September 20, 2019 at 17:01 GMT +00:00 · Published

A group of scientists held a press conference in the Norwegian city of Tromso, Friday, just hours before they were due to set sail on a year-long expedition to the Arctic to study the region's climate.

The head of the expedition addressed the media where he discussed the importance and nature of the study, which is aimed at deepening the experts' understanding of global climate change.

"The largest Arctic research expedition of our time, actually [it] is the largest Arctic that has ever been carried out, is about to start," said the head of the expedition, Markus Rex.

"My goal is to provide a more robust scientific basis for the political decisions, the decisions in our societies say we have to take in all of our countries, and that means more robust climate protection, we need better representation of the Arctic's specific key climate policies," he added.

Rex went on to explain that the Arctic is the "epicentre" of global warming. "It is the part of our planet which warms most rapidly, where warming rates are at least twice the global average," he stated.

The expedition, which aims to study the factors and conditions that affect the Arctic during the changing seasons, will be carried out throughout the course of 12 months aboard the Polarstern vessel as it floats through the region while stuck in the ice. The ship will have on board 600 experts from 19 different nations across the year, with planes set to fly the researchers and additional supplies to and from the vessel.

The Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate project is led by the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI).

Mandatory credit: AWI

Norway: Climate scientists prepare to set sail on year-long Arctic expedition02:27
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A group of scientists held a press conference in the Norwegian city of Tromso, Friday, just hours before they were due to set sail on a year-long expedition to the Arctic to study the region's climate.

The head of the expedition addressed the media where he discussed the importance and nature of the study, which is aimed at deepening the experts' understanding of global climate change.

"The largest Arctic research expedition of our time, actually [it] is the largest Arctic that has ever been carried out, is about to start," said the head of the expedition, Markus Rex.

"My goal is to provide a more robust scientific basis for the political decisions, the decisions in our societies say we have to take in all of our countries, and that means more robust climate protection, we need better representation of the Arctic's specific key climate policies," he added.

Rex went on to explain that the Arctic is the "epicentre" of global warming. "It is the part of our planet which warms most rapidly, where warming rates are at least twice the global average," he stated.

The expedition, which aims to study the factors and conditions that affect the Arctic during the changing seasons, will be carried out throughout the course of 12 months aboard the Polarstern vessel as it floats through the region while stuck in the ice. The ship will have on board 600 experts from 19 different nations across the year, with planes set to fly the researchers and additional supplies to and from the vessel.

The Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate project is led by the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI).

Mandatory credit: AWI