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Denmark: EU competition chief Vestager casts vote in EU elections01:55

Denmark: EU competition chief Vestager casts vote in EU elections

Denmark, Copenhagen
May 26, 2019 at 12:39 GMT +00:00 · Published

European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager, who is also in the running to succeed Jean-Claude Juncker as EU Commission President, cast her vote in the European elections, in Copenhagen on Sunday.

Speaking to journalists after voting, Vestager stated that if she were to become commission president, she would focus on issues such as the climate, technology, rule of law, freedom of the press, gender balancing, and equality.

The European parliamentary elections will see around 400 million people from 28 member states elect a total of 751 Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) between 23-26 May.

Brexit and the rise of right-wing populism loom large over the bloc's ninth parliamentary elections since 1979, while turnout has steadily dwindled since the first elections, from 62 per cent in the inaugural elections to 43 per cent in 2014.

Denmark: EU competition chief Vestager casts vote in EU elections01:55
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European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager, who is also in the running to succeed Jean-Claude Juncker as EU Commission President, cast her vote in the European elections, in Copenhagen on Sunday.

Speaking to journalists after voting, Vestager stated that if she were to become commission president, she would focus on issues such as the climate, technology, rule of law, freedom of the press, gender balancing, and equality.

The European parliamentary elections will see around 400 million people from 28 member states elect a total of 751 Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) between 23-26 May.

Brexit and the rise of right-wing populism loom large over the bloc's ninth parliamentary elections since 1979, while turnout has steadily dwindled since the first elections, from 62 per cent in the inaugural elections to 43 per cent in 2014.