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UK: May says gov't continues to work to avoid no-deal Brexit04:02

UK: May says gov't continues to work to avoid no-deal Brexit

United Kingdom, London
May 1, 2019 at 19:02 GMT +00:00 · Published

UK Prime Minister Theresa May said the government is continuing to work on avoiding a no-deal Brexit, as she was grilled by MPs during a session of the Liaison Committee of the House of Commons in London on Wednesday.

The government's policy is that we want to leave the European Union with a deal and that is what we continue to work for," May told MPs, before adding that it would be "not entirely in the hands of the government" as the Parliament would have to first ratify a decision.

While the Prime Minister conceded that Brexit uncertainty was having a negative impact on businesses and the economy, she rejected the notion of a second referendum.

"Sometimes people say 'Oh, well, people didn't know what the deal was going to be.' Actually, I trust the British people rather more. British people had an instinct of what it was that they wanted to see and they voted," she said.

The UK and the EU have agreed to a 'flexible extension' of Brexit until 31 October.

UK: May says gov't continues to work to avoid no-deal Brexit04:02
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UK Prime Minister Theresa May said the government is continuing to work on avoiding a no-deal Brexit, as she was grilled by MPs during a session of the Liaison Committee of the House of Commons in London on Wednesday.

The government's policy is that we want to leave the European Union with a deal and that is what we continue to work for," May told MPs, before adding that it would be "not entirely in the hands of the government" as the Parliament would have to first ratify a decision.

While the Prime Minister conceded that Brexit uncertainty was having a negative impact on businesses and the economy, she rejected the notion of a second referendum.

"Sometimes people say 'Oh, well, people didn't know what the deal was going to be.' Actually, I trust the British people rather more. British people had an instinct of what it was that they wanted to see and they voted," she said.

The UK and the EU have agreed to a 'flexible extension' of Brexit until 31 October.