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UK: Magna Carta returns to display at Salisbury Cathedral after theft attempt02:25

UK: Magna Carta returns to display at Salisbury Cathedral after theft attempt

United Kingdom, Salisbury
February 4, 2019 at 14:33 GMT +00:00 · Published

One of the four original copies of the 1215 Magna Carta has been put back on display at Salisbury Cathedral on Monday, after an attempted theft last year.

Salisbury Cathedral invited media to preview the Magna Carta's new case, since the document has been removed from display for three months after the attack. Footage shows the holes created by multiple hammer blows to the old glass case.

The Salisbury Cathedral archivist, Emily Naish explained that "somebody attacked the display case with a hammer. So, obviously, we couldn’t have the document on display, unless we had a secure case to put it in."

"The glass in the case did exactly what we would have expected it to do. It didn’t shatter, the document itself was within a second case within the damaged case, and that was completely undamaged," she added.

In October 2018, a man wielding a hammer repeatedly hit the security glass case in an attempt to allegedly gain access to the priceless document, which according to Naish, is "one of four original copies which were made in 1215, issued and approved by King John."

UK: Magna Carta returns to display at Salisbury Cathedral after theft attempt02:25
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One of the four original copies of the 1215 Magna Carta has been put back on display at Salisbury Cathedral on Monday, after an attempted theft last year.

Salisbury Cathedral invited media to preview the Magna Carta's new case, since the document has been removed from display for three months after the attack. Footage shows the holes created by multiple hammer blows to the old glass case.

The Salisbury Cathedral archivist, Emily Naish explained that "somebody attacked the display case with a hammer. So, obviously, we couldn’t have the document on display, unless we had a secure case to put it in."

"The glass in the case did exactly what we would have expected it to do. It didn’t shatter, the document itself was within a second case within the damaged case, and that was completely undamaged," she added.

In October 2018, a man wielding a hammer repeatedly hit the security glass case in an attempt to allegedly gain access to the priceless document, which according to Naish, is "one of four original copies which were made in 1215, issued and approved by King John."