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Hong Kong: New chief executive Lam vows to ‘heal the divide’ after election win02:54

Hong Kong: New chief executive Lam vows to ‘heal the divide’ after election win

Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of China, Hong Kong
March 26, 2017 at 02:51 GMT +00:00 · Published

Following her victory in the Hong Kong election on Sunday, Carrie Lam said in a press conference that she will do her "utmost to uphold one country, two systems, and to guard our core values."

"Hong Kong, our home, is suffering from quite a serious divisiveness, and has accumulated a lot of frustrations," Lam stated, adding that her priority as chief executive would be "to heal the divide, and to ease the frustrations, and to unite our society to move forward."

A pre-selected 1,194-member electorate committee voted in favour of the pro-Beijing candidate by 777 votes, more than double runner-up and former financial secretary John Tsang.

The outcome of the race was widely seen as pre-determined by China's Central Government as only 0.03% of Hong Kong's registered voters were eligible to vote, with most of the election committee reportedly loyal to Beijing.

This election was the first since 2014's pro-democracy protests, also known as the 'Umbrella Revolution.' For about 80 days hundreds of thousands of protesters blocked streets to demand a 'one person, one vote' system for Hong Kong.

Hong Kong: New chief executive Lam vows to ‘heal the divide’ after election win02:54
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Following her victory in the Hong Kong election on Sunday, Carrie Lam said in a press conference that she will do her "utmost to uphold one country, two systems, and to guard our core values."

"Hong Kong, our home, is suffering from quite a serious divisiveness, and has accumulated a lot of frustrations," Lam stated, adding that her priority as chief executive would be "to heal the divide, and to ease the frustrations, and to unite our society to move forward."

A pre-selected 1,194-member electorate committee voted in favour of the pro-Beijing candidate by 777 votes, more than double runner-up and former financial secretary John Tsang.

The outcome of the race was widely seen as pre-determined by China's Central Government as only 0.03% of Hong Kong's registered voters were eligible to vote, with most of the election committee reportedly loyal to Beijing.

This election was the first since 2014's pro-democracy protests, also known as the 'Umbrella Revolution.' For about 80 days hundreds of thousands of protesters blocked streets to demand a 'one person, one vote' system for Hong Kong.