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Ukraine: Dnepropetrovsk sign torn down as part of 'de-communisation' plan02:00

Ukraine: Dnepropetrovsk sign torn down as part of 'de-communisation' plan

Ukraine, Dnepropetrovsk
May 24, 2016 at 20:12 GMT +00:00 · Published

Dnepropetrovsk authorities began tearing down signs bearing the city's name on Tuesday, in the wake of the city's name change to 'Dnipro' which is being implemented as part of a 'de-communisation' program issued by Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko.

A total of 247 Deputies in the Verkhovna Rada approved the move to change the name of the city from Dnepropetrovsk to Dnipro last Thursday.

Last year, Poroshenko signed a number of decrees ordering the removal of the names of streets, parks, squares and cities that have Soviet heritage as part of a 'de-communisation' program.

Dnepropetrovsk was originally called Yekaterinoslav but the name was changed in 1925 by the Bolsheviks.

Other examples of this policy were Simbirsk which became Ulyanovsk (Lenin’s family name), as well as hundreds more usually named after a Russian Tsar or Tsaritsa.

Ukraine: Dnepropetrovsk sign torn down as part of 'de-communisation' plan02:00
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Dnepropetrovsk authorities began tearing down signs bearing the city's name on Tuesday, in the wake of the city's name change to 'Dnipro' which is being implemented as part of a 'de-communisation' program issued by Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko.

A total of 247 Deputies in the Verkhovna Rada approved the move to change the name of the city from Dnepropetrovsk to Dnipro last Thursday.

Last year, Poroshenko signed a number of decrees ordering the removal of the names of streets, parks, squares and cities that have Soviet heritage as part of a 'de-communisation' program.

Dnepropetrovsk was originally called Yekaterinoslav but the name was changed in 1925 by the Bolsheviks.

Other examples of this policy were Simbirsk which became Ulyanovsk (Lenin’s family name), as well as hundreds more usually named after a Russian Tsar or Tsaritsa.