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Nagorno-Karabakh: Tanks roll through Stepanakert after fighting erupts00:30

Nagorno-Karabakh: Tanks roll through Stepanakert after fighting erupts

Disputed Territory, Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh
April 2, 2016 at 20:13 GMT +00:00 · Published

Self-propelled Armenian artillery and units and tanks moved through the streets of Stepanakert, capital of the unrecognised Nagorno-Karabakh region, towards the frontline on Saturday.

The territorial dispute between Armenia and Azerbaijan erupted into violence on Friday night, with the countries blaming each other for the resumption of hostilities. The self-proclaimed Nagorno-Karabakh Defence Ministry released a statement earlier on Saturday, saying that escalation of the conflict had been noted in the southern, south-eastern and north-eastern areas of the territory. Both sides reportedly used tanks, artillery and aircraft.

The conflict over the area dates back to 1988, when the Nagorno-Karabakh region, a predominantly Armenian mountainous region that was part of Azerbaijan, broke away from the Azerbaijan Soviet Socialist Republic. It declared independence in 1991, triggering a full-scale war which ended only after Russia brokered a ceasefire between the two countries in 1994. Clashes still break out periodically in the region. Nagorno-Karabakh is recognised by the United Nations (UN) as being part of Azerbaijan but has been under the control of Armenian military forces since 1994.

According to reports, Russian President Vladimir Putin has called on all sides to agree a ceasefire.

Nagorno-Karabakh: Tanks roll through Stepanakert after fighting erupts00:30
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Description

Self-propelled Armenian artillery and units and tanks moved through the streets of Stepanakert, capital of the unrecognised Nagorno-Karabakh region, towards the frontline on Saturday.

The territorial dispute between Armenia and Azerbaijan erupted into violence on Friday night, with the countries blaming each other for the resumption of hostilities. The self-proclaimed Nagorno-Karabakh Defence Ministry released a statement earlier on Saturday, saying that escalation of the conflict had been noted in the southern, south-eastern and north-eastern areas of the territory. Both sides reportedly used tanks, artillery and aircraft.

The conflict over the area dates back to 1988, when the Nagorno-Karabakh region, a predominantly Armenian mountainous region that was part of Azerbaijan, broke away from the Azerbaijan Soviet Socialist Republic. It declared independence in 1991, triggering a full-scale war which ended only after Russia brokered a ceasefire between the two countries in 1994. Clashes still break out periodically in the region. Nagorno-Karabakh is recognised by the United Nations (UN) as being part of Azerbaijan but has been under the control of Armenian military forces since 1994.

According to reports, Russian President Vladimir Putin has called on all sides to agree a ceasefire.