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Italy: Protesters slam Renzi's 'Good School' reforms on Student Day in Milan02:08

Italy: Protesters slam Renzi's 'Good School' reforms on Student Day in Milan

Italy, Milan
November 17, 2015 at 16:06 GMT +00:00 · Published

Hundreds of students marched through Milan on International Student Day, Tuesday, as part of widespread protest against the Italian government's 'Good School' education reforms.

Protesters lit flares and held banners decrying Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and Education Minister Stefania Giannini's recent changes to the education sector. Some students dumped bricks in front of Milan's city hall to criticise the allegedly poor conditions of school buildings. When the demonstration arrived in front of the city's French consulate, one protester left a bunch of flowers to commemorate the victims of Friday's Paris attacks.

The education reforms were approved by the Italian parliament in early July. Renzi promised to hire 100,000 teachers on permanent contracts, as well as offering wage raises based on merit rather than age. Although the reforms were packaged as decreasing the amount of part-time workers, the protesters consider the reforms unfair. According to teachers and students, the changes are mostly benefiting private schools, while state schools face underfunding.

Italy: Protesters slam Renzi's 'Good School' reforms on Student Day in Milan02:08
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Hundreds of students marched through Milan on International Student Day, Tuesday, as part of widespread protest against the Italian government's 'Good School' education reforms.

Protesters lit flares and held banners decrying Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and Education Minister Stefania Giannini's recent changes to the education sector. Some students dumped bricks in front of Milan's city hall to criticise the allegedly poor conditions of school buildings. When the demonstration arrived in front of the city's French consulate, one protester left a bunch of flowers to commemorate the victims of Friday's Paris attacks.

The education reforms were approved by the Italian parliament in early July. Renzi promised to hire 100,000 teachers on permanent contracts, as well as offering wage raises based on merit rather than age. Although the reforms were packaged as decreasing the amount of part-time workers, the protesters consider the reforms unfair. According to teachers and students, the changes are mostly benefiting private schools, while state schools face underfunding.