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Syria: Meet Anas  Nour, the twins who could be torn apart by Syria's ongoing war01:44

Syria: Meet Anas Nour, the twins who could be torn apart by Syria's ongoing war

Syrian Arab Republic, Damascus
September 22, 2015 at 15:05 GMT +00:00 · Published

With the issue of Syrian refugees dividing opinion in Europe, 20-year-old twins Anas and Nour spoke from the nation’s capital of Damascus on September 16, with the former lamenting the prospect of losing Nour as his brother considers making the perilous journey across the Mediterranean in the hope of reaching northern Europe. "I don't think it's worth (it) for him to make this trip,” Anas said, expressing hope that the war in Syria ends “before he travels.”

Nour is preparing to make the treacherous journey across the Mediterranean, which has claimed over 2,400 lives in 2015 alone, during the dangerous winter months when temperatures can drop below zero. "My brother is a part of me," Nour said, attempting to address his twin brother’s fears. "His soul will be with my heart and for sure he will stay with me right until I arrive to Germany."

The difference in opinion between the twin brothers comes as the four and a half year Syrian conflict continues to rage, with the United Nations (UN) estimating that over 220,000 people have been killed since violence erupted in March 2011. "I don’t blame those who have to leave,” a local woman in Damascus’ Old Town said as she considered the gravity of the violence in the country, “but I always pray to God that things will improve here and we can stay."

With European Union justice and interior ministers set to meet in Brussels on September 22 to discuss the refugee crisis rocking Europe, one woman questioned the motives of European political leaders in hosting displaced Syrians. "They're doing it for their own benefit, not for us,” she said, “taking people who are well educated with university degrees: doctors, lawyers, engineers, they’re taking the elite of Syrian society and depleting Syria of its intellectual wealth,” she added.

The UN estimates that 4.1 million people have fled Syria since the beginning of the conflict, with a further 7.6 million people internally displaced by the violence. Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq have received the highest numbers of Syrian refugees, with over 3 million Syrians having fled to the country's closest neighbours. In total, the UN estimates that 12.2 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance.

Syria: Meet Anas  Nour, the twins who could be torn apart by Syria's ongoing war01:44
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With the issue of Syrian refugees dividing opinion in Europe, 20-year-old twins Anas and Nour spoke from the nation’s capital of Damascus on September 16, with the former lamenting the prospect of losing Nour as his brother considers making the perilous journey across the Mediterranean in the hope of reaching northern Europe. "I don't think it's worth (it) for him to make this trip,” Anas said, expressing hope that the war in Syria ends “before he travels.”

Nour is preparing to make the treacherous journey across the Mediterranean, which has claimed over 2,400 lives in 2015 alone, during the dangerous winter months when temperatures can drop below zero. "My brother is a part of me," Nour said, attempting to address his twin brother’s fears. "His soul will be with my heart and for sure he will stay with me right until I arrive to Germany."

The difference in opinion between the twin brothers comes as the four and a half year Syrian conflict continues to rage, with the United Nations (UN) estimating that over 220,000 people have been killed since violence erupted in March 2011. "I don’t blame those who have to leave,” a local woman in Damascus’ Old Town said as she considered the gravity of the violence in the country, “but I always pray to God that things will improve here and we can stay."

With European Union justice and interior ministers set to meet in Brussels on September 22 to discuss the refugee crisis rocking Europe, one woman questioned the motives of European political leaders in hosting displaced Syrians. "They're doing it for their own benefit, not for us,” she said, “taking people who are well educated with university degrees: doctors, lawyers, engineers, they’re taking the elite of Syrian society and depleting Syria of its intellectual wealth,” she added.

The UN estimates that 4.1 million people have fled Syria since the beginning of the conflict, with a further 7.6 million people internally displaced by the violence. Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq have received the highest numbers of Syrian refugees, with over 3 million Syrians having fled to the country's closest neighbours. In total, the UN estimates that 12.2 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance.