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Russia: Tourists can now visit a top secret submarine base in Sevastopol01:35

Russia: Tourists can now visit a top secret submarine base in Sevastopol

Russian Federation, Sevastopol
August 14, 2015 at 01:16 GMT +00:00 · Published

Visitors could feel as if they were in a spy movie as they strolled through the Naval Museum Complex in Sevastopol on Friday.

Formerly known as Facility 825 GTS, the museum now displays the remnants of a military installation, designed to protect people against a direct nuclear bomb. Situated in the mountain of Tavros, the museum boasts an underground water channel with dry docks, repair workshops, fuel storages and an exhibition of torpedo parts. According to the director of the museum, Uriy Tarariev, the museum generates a lot of interest form the film industry and he regularly receives requests to use it as a movie location.

During the Cold War Joseph Stalin gave a decree to find a location where submarines could be at the ready for a nuclear strike. The secret base was closed in 1993, but became a museum in 2003 after ten years of refurbishing, with all structures containing non-ferrous metals now removed.

Russia: Tourists can now visit a top secret submarine base in Sevastopol01:35
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Description

Visitors could feel as if they were in a spy movie as they strolled through the Naval Museum Complex in Sevastopol on Friday.

Formerly known as Facility 825 GTS, the museum now displays the remnants of a military installation, designed to protect people against a direct nuclear bomb. Situated in the mountain of Tavros, the museum boasts an underground water channel with dry docks, repair workshops, fuel storages and an exhibition of torpedo parts. According to the director of the museum, Uriy Tarariev, the museum generates a lot of interest form the film industry and he regularly receives requests to use it as a movie location.

During the Cold War Joseph Stalin gave a decree to find a location where submarines could be at the ready for a nuclear strike. The secret base was closed in 1993, but became a museum in 2003 after ten years of refurbishing, with all structures containing non-ferrous metals now removed.