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Germany: Greek economy was on the "right path" before Syriza, says Schaeuble01:04

Germany: Greek economy was on the "right path" before Syriza, says Schaeuble

Germany, Berlin
July 17, 2015 at 15:39 GMT +00:00 · Published

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said Greece's economy was growing in December last year, before Syriza came to power, in a speech at the Bundestag debate on a bailout deal for Athens in Berlin on Friday. The comments, in which he cited an International Monetary Fund report, were made ahead of a vote on whether Germany should start negotiations on a third rescue package for Greece.

After the decision in Brussels to negotiate a new bailout for Greece, Germany's lower house of parliament will vote on a mandate for the German government to negotiate with Athens on a third bailout. The Greek parliament has already voted in favour of the bailout package which features a raft of austerity measures.

The proposed bailout currently stands at €86 billion ($94 billion), a large proportion of which is expected to be underwritten by Germany.

Germany: Greek economy was on the "right path" before Syriza, says Schaeuble01:04
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German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said Greece's economy was growing in December last year, before Syriza came to power, in a speech at the Bundestag debate on a bailout deal for Athens in Berlin on Friday. The comments, in which he cited an International Monetary Fund report, were made ahead of a vote on whether Germany should start negotiations on a third rescue package for Greece.

After the decision in Brussels to negotiate a new bailout for Greece, Germany's lower house of parliament will vote on a mandate for the German government to negotiate with Athens on a third bailout. The Greek parliament has already voted in favour of the bailout package which features a raft of austerity measures.

The proposed bailout currently stands at €86 billion ($94 billion), a large proportion of which is expected to be underwritten by Germany.