This site uses cookies. By accepting cookies you can optimise your browsing experience. Read more.
Spain: Ahora Madrid celebrate municipal election gains with street rally01:15

Spain: Ahora Madrid celebrate municipal election gains with street rally

Spain, Madrid
May 25, 2015 at 20:34 GMT +00:00 · Published

Members of the Ahora Madrid party, along with their leader Manuela Carmena, Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias and hundreds of supporters celebrated in the streets of Madrid, early Monday, after taking 20 seats in the capital's city council on Sunday during Spain's regional and local elections.

Whilst the ruling People's Party (PP) won Madrid's municipal elections, taking 21 out of 57 seats, Podemos-backed Ahora Madrid, who came second with 20 seats, and the Socialists (PSOE), who came third with a total of nine seats could prevent the PP from taking control of Madrid's city council. By forming a coalition, PSOE and Ahora Madrid could rule with an overall majority of 29 seats, while a right-wing coalition between the PP and Ciudadanos - who gained seven seats - would not be sufficient to maintain control of the city council in this case.

Despite their apparent overall victory in the local elections, the PP look to have suffered one of their worst results in more than 20 years with voters angry over public spending cuts and reports of corruption within Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's government.

Spain: Ahora Madrid celebrate municipal election gains with street rally01:15
No Account? Sign up!
Top downloads in last 24 hours
Show more
Description

Members of the Ahora Madrid party, along with their leader Manuela Carmena, Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias and hundreds of supporters celebrated in the streets of Madrid, early Monday, after taking 20 seats in the capital's city council on Sunday during Spain's regional and local elections.

Whilst the ruling People's Party (PP) won Madrid's municipal elections, taking 21 out of 57 seats, Podemos-backed Ahora Madrid, who came second with 20 seats, and the Socialists (PSOE), who came third with a total of nine seats could prevent the PP from taking control of Madrid's city council. By forming a coalition, PSOE and Ahora Madrid could rule with an overall majority of 29 seats, while a right-wing coalition between the PP and Ciudadanos - who gained seven seats - would not be sufficient to maintain control of the city council in this case.

Despite their apparent overall victory in the local elections, the PP look to have suffered one of their worst results in more than 20 years with voters angry over public spending cuts and reports of corruption within Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's government.