This site uses cookies. By accepting cookies you can optimise your browsing experience. Read more.
USA: Obama becomes third president to address an audience at a synagogue00:51

USA: Obama becomes third president to address an audience at a synagogue

United States, Washington D.C.
May 22, 2015 at 09:39 GMT +00:00 · Published

US President Barack Obama became only the third sitting American president to speak to a congregation at a US synagogue, Friday when he delivered a speech from the pulpit of Adas Israel in Washington D.C.

Speaking in honour of Jewish American Heritage Month, Obama reminded his audience of the times the US had failed to live up to its "lofty ideals," mentioning the subjegation of African-Americans through slavery and Jim Crow, and the genocidal treatment of Native Americans. "And far too often American Jews faced the scourge of anti-Semitism here at home," Obama added.

President Ulysses S. Grant lay the cornerstone of the Adas Israel synagogue's first building in 1876, as an apology for expelling Jews from the territories he administered as a General in Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee during the Civil War.

USA: Obama becomes third president to address an audience at a synagogue00:51
Pool for subscribers only
No Account? Sign up!
Top downloads in last 24 hours
Show more
Description

US President Barack Obama became only the third sitting American president to speak to a congregation at a US synagogue, Friday when he delivered a speech from the pulpit of Adas Israel in Washington D.C.

Speaking in honour of Jewish American Heritage Month, Obama reminded his audience of the times the US had failed to live up to its "lofty ideals," mentioning the subjegation of African-Americans through slavery and Jim Crow, and the genocidal treatment of Native Americans. "And far too often American Jews faced the scourge of anti-Semitism here at home," Obama added.

President Ulysses S. Grant lay the cornerstone of the Adas Israel synagogue's first building in 1876, as an apology for expelling Jews from the territories he administered as a General in Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee during the Civil War.