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Spain: Drone captures 2,200 year old 'Hannibal battle ground'00:42

Spain: Drone captures 2,200 year old 'Hannibal battle ground'

Spain, Valls
January 29, 2015 at 10:38 GMT +00:00 · Published

Drone footage of a 2,200 year old moat in Valls that contains objects linked to the Carthaginian general Hannibal was released by the University of Barcelona (UB), Thursday.

UB archaeology undergraduates discovered the site, which is believed to hold evidence of Hannibal and his troops' presence in the Catalan area, formerly called Vilar de Vals. Keeping up the ancient city's defences, the moat may have been 40 metres (131 feet) wide, five metres (16 feet) deep, and stretch along over 400 metres (1312 feet). The directors of the archaeological excavation, Jaume Noguera and Jordi Lopez, believe the site may have been attacked and destroyed by Romans in 218-202 BC, during the Second Punic War.

Around 100 students took part in the field work using metal detectors, aerial photography and electrical tomography - a non-invasive technique which analyses soil anomalies.

Spain: Drone captures 2,200 year old 'Hannibal battle ground'00:42
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Drone footage of a 2,200 year old moat in Valls that contains objects linked to the Carthaginian general Hannibal was released by the University of Barcelona (UB), Thursday.

UB archaeology undergraduates discovered the site, which is believed to hold evidence of Hannibal and his troops' presence in the Catalan area, formerly called Vilar de Vals. Keeping up the ancient city's defences, the moat may have been 40 metres (131 feet) wide, five metres (16 feet) deep, and stretch along over 400 metres (1312 feet). The directors of the archaeological excavation, Jaume Noguera and Jordi Lopez, believe the site may have been attacked and destroyed by Romans in 218-202 BC, during the Second Punic War.

Around 100 students took part in the field work using metal detectors, aerial photography and electrical tomography - a non-invasive technique which analyses soil anomalies.