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USA: See a sky-high view of LAVA oozing toward Hawaiian town00:53

USA: See a sky-high view of LAVA oozing toward Hawaiian town

United States, Pahoa
November 2, 2014 at 17:38 GMT +00:00 · Published

Oozing lava continued to creep Saturday towards the area of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawai'i, though officials said it had stalled roughly 480 feet (146 metres) from the main road in the town with a population of about 950. Aerial footage from throughout the week showed the lava's advance.

At least 80 Hawaii National Guard Members to be called up to assist in working to contain the flow of molten rock. A total of 20 families were ordered to evacuate Wednesday as the lava advanced, while 50 more households have been warned they should be prepared to leave quickly.

The lava flow began in June, when the volcano Kilauea erupted. Kilauea, whose name means "spewing" in Hawaiian, is considered the most active volcano on earth. A United States Geological Survey (USGS) scientist has said the flow may continue for up to 30 years.

Footage courtesy: County of Hawaii, Ena Media Hawaii and Blue Hawaiian Helicopters

USA: See a sky-high view of LAVA oozing toward Hawaiian town00:53
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Description

Oozing lava continued to creep Saturday towards the area of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawai'i, though officials said it had stalled roughly 480 feet (146 metres) from the main road in the town with a population of about 950. Aerial footage from throughout the week showed the lava's advance.

At least 80 Hawaii National Guard Members to be called up to assist in working to contain the flow of molten rock. A total of 20 families were ordered to evacuate Wednesday as the lava advanced, while 50 more households have been warned they should be prepared to leave quickly.

The lava flow began in June, when the volcano Kilauea erupted. Kilauea, whose name means "spewing" in Hawaiian, is considered the most active volcano on earth. A United States Geological Survey (USGS) scientist has said the flow may continue for up to 30 years.

Footage courtesy: County of Hawaii, Ena Media Hawaii and Blue Hawaiian Helicopters