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UN: Violence must stop in Central African Republic- UN advisor00:56

UN: Violence must stop in Central African Republic- UN advisor

United Nations, New York City
January 7, 2014 at 04:46 GMT +00:00 · Published

USA: Violence must stop in Central African Republic- UN advisor

Jeffrey D. Feltman, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, called for a 'stop to all violence' in Central African Republic during a UN Security Council press conference in New York on Monday.

Feltman also called for 'an end to vengence attacks, and to warn those responsible, that they will be held accountable for atrocities'.

Around half a million citizens of the Central African Republic's capital, Bangui, have been made homeless due to continued violence between Christian and Muslim militias. A fifth of those made homeless have crowded into a refugee camp outside the city's airport.

The country has been in turmoil since March 2013, after Seleka, a rebel group, staged a coup, placing Michel Djotoda as Central Africa Republic's first Muslim president. Approximately 50 per cent of the Central Africa Republic are Christian, meanwhile 15 per cent are Muslim.

UN: Violence must stop in Central African Republic- UN advisor00:56
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USA: Violence must stop in Central African Republic- UN advisor

Jeffrey D. Feltman, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, called for a 'stop to all violence' in Central African Republic during a UN Security Council press conference in New York on Monday.

Feltman also called for 'an end to vengence attacks, and to warn those responsible, that they will be held accountable for atrocities'.

Around half a million citizens of the Central African Republic's capital, Bangui, have been made homeless due to continued violence between Christian and Muslim militias. A fifth of those made homeless have crowded into a refugee camp outside the city's airport.

The country has been in turmoil since March 2013, after Seleka, a rebel group, staged a coup, placing Michel Djotoda as Central Africa Republic's first Muslim president. Approximately 50 per cent of the Central Africa Republic are Christian, meanwhile 15 per cent are Muslim.