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Germany: German and Afghan DMs meet over withdrawal and elections01:20

Germany: German and Afghan DMs meet over withdrawal and elections

Germany, Berlin
October 24, 2013 at 08:04 GMT +00:00 · Published

Germany: German and Afghan DMs meet over withdrawal and elections

The German minister of defence Thomas De Maiziere received his Afghan counterpart Bismillah Kahn Mohammadi on Thursday in Berlin, as the proposed date of NATO and German withdrawal draws closer.

Both ministers took part in the welcoming ceremony, in which the Afghan minister laid a wreath to honour the soldiers who have died in the conflict.

The meeting aims to assess the regional security situation and the requirements for future support. Also on the agenda are the next Afghan presidential elections in 2014 and the use of German facilities in Mazar-e Sharif. Germany has maintained a deployment of over 5,000 troops in Afghanistan. Ulrich Kirsch, the head of the German army association, has indicated that Germany could stay beyond 2014.

Germany: German and Afghan DMs meet over withdrawal and elections01:20
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Germany: German and Afghan DMs meet over withdrawal and elections

The German minister of defence Thomas De Maiziere received his Afghan counterpart Bismillah Kahn Mohammadi on Thursday in Berlin, as the proposed date of NATO and German withdrawal draws closer.

Both ministers took part in the welcoming ceremony, in which the Afghan minister laid a wreath to honour the soldiers who have died in the conflict.

The meeting aims to assess the regional security situation and the requirements for future support. Also on the agenda are the next Afghan presidential elections in 2014 and the use of German facilities in Mazar-e Sharif. Germany has maintained a deployment of over 5,000 troops in Afghanistan. Ulrich Kirsch, the head of the German army association, has indicated that Germany could stay beyond 2014.