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UK: Belfast sees second night of violence00:53

UK: Belfast sees second night of violence

United Kingdom, Belfast
July 14, 2013 at 05:38 GMT +00:00 · Published

UK: Belfast sees second night of violence

Clashes between religious groups and police in Northern Ireland erupted for a second night in a row in north Belfast on Saturday. Petrol bombs, stones, bottles, and fireworks were hurled at police, who responded with bursts from water cannons.

Hundreds of extra police from mainland Britain were called in to provide security for the 2013 Orange Day marches. Over 30 police officers have been injured while dozens have been arrested since the start of clashes on Friday.

The march by the pro-British, Protestant Orange Order spiralled into unrest on Friday after their marching route was shortened to keep it from passing by a sectarian flash point.

The annual Orange Order parades commemorate the day the Protestant forces of King William of Orange defeated the Catholic armies of James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. In Northern Ireland, parade routes are routinely changed to avoid confrontation at points of the march that cross through Catholic nationalist areas. The commemorations are seen by many in the Catholic community as a show of Protestant supremacy.

UK: Belfast sees second night of violence00:53
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UK: Belfast sees second night of violence

Clashes between religious groups and police in Northern Ireland erupted for a second night in a row in north Belfast on Saturday. Petrol bombs, stones, bottles, and fireworks were hurled at police, who responded with bursts from water cannons.

Hundreds of extra police from mainland Britain were called in to provide security for the 2013 Orange Day marches. Over 30 police officers have been injured while dozens have been arrested since the start of clashes on Friday.

The march by the pro-British, Protestant Orange Order spiralled into unrest on Friday after their marching route was shortened to keep it from passing by a sectarian flash point.

The annual Orange Order parades commemorate the day the Protestant forces of King William of Orange defeated the Catholic armies of James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. In Northern Ireland, parade routes are routinely changed to avoid confrontation at points of the march that cross through Catholic nationalist areas. The commemorations are seen by many in the Catholic community as a show of Protestant supremacy.