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Turkey: Erdogan's "foul play" as Taksim is cleared00:57

Turkey: Erdogan's "foul play" as Taksim is cleared

Turkey, Istanbul
June 15, 2013 at 19:55 GMT +00:00 · Published

Turkey: Erdogan's "foul play" as Taksim is cleared

Turkish police have cleared the centre of the Turkish protest movement, Gezi park and Taksim Square shortly after Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned protesters to leave by Sunday and promising that the security forces would be able to intervene and clear the area. The clashes came a day ahead of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's deadline for protesters causing many protesters to accuse the prime minister of foul play.

Police have managed to take control of both Gezi park and Taksim square though the streets surrounding the two locations are filled with protesters and clashes have been ongoing. Protesters have barricaded themselves into nearby hotels and buildings. Protesters are also attempting to barricade streets and highways to block police advances using carts, trolleys, cars, trucks and police barricades.

Erdogan agreed to suspend plans to demolish Istanbul's Gezi park, however, protesters vowed to remain in the square, stating that Erdogan's concessions are not enough. Erdogan agreed to put the unpopular construction project on hold after meeting with a group of delegates from the protest movement on Friday - a measure taken when demonstrators rejected his previous 'final warning' to leave the park. Taksim Solidarity representatives travelled to the capital Ankara for late-night talks with Erdogan, the first such talks since the unrest began.

Turkey's worst period of unrest in over a decade began on May 31 in Gezi Park, an Istanbul green space where demonstrators rallied against plans to transform the park by replacing it with a shopping centre and Ottoman-style barracks. The protests soon spread to 78 cities across the country, attracting tens of thousands of people each night. The catalyst for the nation-wide unrest was the police reaction to protests, which has been condemned by world leaders.

Five people have been killed - including a police officer - since the protests began, and the Turkish government says that up to 600 police have been injured in clashes while Turkey's Medical Association said that around 5,000 people have sought treatment in hospitals for minor injuries and breathing problems after enduring attacks of tear gas. The fifth confirmed death related to protest violence was announced on Thursday.

Turkey: Erdogan's "foul play" as Taksim is cleared00:57
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Turkey: Erdogan's "foul play" as Taksim is cleared

Turkish police have cleared the centre of the Turkish protest movement, Gezi park and Taksim Square shortly after Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned protesters to leave by Sunday and promising that the security forces would be able to intervene and clear the area. The clashes came a day ahead of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's deadline for protesters causing many protesters to accuse the prime minister of foul play.

Police have managed to take control of both Gezi park and Taksim square though the streets surrounding the two locations are filled with protesters and clashes have been ongoing. Protesters have barricaded themselves into nearby hotels and buildings. Protesters are also attempting to barricade streets and highways to block police advances using carts, trolleys, cars, trucks and police barricades.

Erdogan agreed to suspend plans to demolish Istanbul's Gezi park, however, protesters vowed to remain in the square, stating that Erdogan's concessions are not enough. Erdogan agreed to put the unpopular construction project on hold after meeting with a group of delegates from the protest movement on Friday - a measure taken when demonstrators rejected his previous 'final warning' to leave the park. Taksim Solidarity representatives travelled to the capital Ankara for late-night talks with Erdogan, the first such talks since the unrest began.

Turkey's worst period of unrest in over a decade began on May 31 in Gezi Park, an Istanbul green space where demonstrators rallied against plans to transform the park by replacing it with a shopping centre and Ottoman-style barracks. The protests soon spread to 78 cities across the country, attracting tens of thousands of people each night. The catalyst for the nation-wide unrest was the police reaction to protests, which has been condemned by world leaders.

Five people have been killed - including a police officer - since the protests began, and the Turkish government says that up to 600 police have been injured in clashes while Turkey's Medical Association said that around 5,000 people have sought treatment in hospitals for minor injuries and breathing problems after enduring attacks of tear gas. The fifth confirmed death related to protest violence was announced on Thursday.