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Sweden: Smallest deer in the world enjoys first sunshine00:57

Sweden: Smallest deer in the world enjoys first sunshine

Sweden, Eskilstuna
June 14, 2013 at 16:38 GMT +00:00 · Published

Sweden: Smallest deer in the world enjoys first sunshine

Moa, a 3-week-old Southern Pudu baby enjoyed her first days under the Swedish sun in Parken Zoo, Eskilstuna on Friday. When it was born Moa only weighed 1.36 kilograms. Adult Southern Pudu's, like Moa's parents Odense and Andre, can grow to a height of around 40 centimetres and can weigh up till 10 kilograms. The small deers have a vegetarian diet consisting of grass, fruits, leaves and herbs.

Coming from mountain forests in South America, the Southern Pudu is an endangered species. They can live up to 1700 metres above sea level. In the last 3 generations, the Southern Pudu population has decreased by 30 percent as a consequence of human behaviour affecting their natural habitat. Due to overpopulation and activities such as logging and hunting less than 10,000 Southern Pudus are currently alive.

According to Moa's caretaker, Louise Nilsberth, she has small white dots "for camouflage, so that she won't be taken by big animals like big birds or predators."

Sweden: Smallest deer in the world enjoys first sunshine00:57
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Sweden: Smallest deer in the world enjoys first sunshine

Moa, a 3-week-old Southern Pudu baby enjoyed her first days under the Swedish sun in Parken Zoo, Eskilstuna on Friday. When it was born Moa only weighed 1.36 kilograms. Adult Southern Pudu's, like Moa's parents Odense and Andre, can grow to a height of around 40 centimetres and can weigh up till 10 kilograms. The small deers have a vegetarian diet consisting of grass, fruits, leaves and herbs.

Coming from mountain forests in South America, the Southern Pudu is an endangered species. They can live up to 1700 metres above sea level. In the last 3 generations, the Southern Pudu population has decreased by 30 percent as a consequence of human behaviour affecting their natural habitat. Due to overpopulation and activities such as logging and hunting less than 10,000 Southern Pudus are currently alive.

According to Moa's caretaker, Louise Nilsberth, she has small white dots "for camouflage, so that she won't be taken by big animals like big birds or predators."